Quality: A lost art?

A friend recently complained to me about her children’s shoes and how she can barely make it one season before they wear out – something she doesn’t remember happening when she was younger. When I asked her where she was buying these shabby shoes, she mentioned a big-box budget store. I wasn’t especially sympathetic!

It’s something we’ve seen in the translation industry for the past several years. In what seems like a race to the bottom in price, with a machine-based world of quick and cheap translation services, the idea of quality translation can be overlooked by many companies today.

At Rossion, we’ve got the “quick” part nailed down, as we always deliver projects with speed and on time. And price-wise, we are competitive. But where we like to break away from the herd is in the quality department.

Under the banner of quality, we’ve established a number of core values and processes that don’t exist in most places, both online and in the world of professional translation:

  • Providing peace of mind – we use only qualified translators, as set out by ISO 17100 and CAN/CGSB 131.10 standards.
  • Communication – our clients always know what’s happening with their project, as we follow a strict process and stay in regular communication. This also helps us obtain the right terminology from the beginning, clearer original text to work from, and ultimately fewer problems en route to a great end product.
  • Teamwork – getting the best quality is a collaborative effort; our team of professionals includes account managers, project managers, and proofreaders, on top of the certified and qualified translators and of course, our clients. A great translation starts with your great content.
  • Commitment – projects are delivered on time, bottom line.
  • Value – very simply, quality translation at competitive prices.

All of the above exists under what is commonly known as “quality assurance.” This term essentially means taking proactive steps and installing processes to ensure a quality outcome.

The next time you are sending your project for translation, ask yourself about the quality of translation you expect. Does the language service provider have a set of core values and process that match your own? Other questions you might add to your checklist:

  • Does the Language Service Provider give you peace of mind? Namely, are they using qualified translators, as set out by CAN/CGSB 131.10 and ISO 17100?
  • Do you have regular, open communication with your account manager or project manager?
  • Do you have a reliable, professional team working on your content?

These are the main things to consider to ensure your own message doesn’t get lost in translation!

Quality matters and you get it with Rossion.

Links:

Myths about translation

Post by Fiona

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